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SCHOLARS AT WAR LECTURE SERIES

Der Angriff Russlands auf die Ukraine fordert täglich neue Opfer, Millionen Menschen sind auf der Flucht - darunter auch viele Wissenschaftler:innen mit ihren Familien. Das Historische Seminar der Fakultät für Geschichts- und Kunstwissenschaften der LMU veranstaltet gemeinsam mit dem Center for Jewish Studies an der Fordham University New York, der American Academy for Jewish Research und dem Center for Urban History in Lviv eine neue (online-)Vortragsreihe: SCHOLARS AT WAR LECTURE SERIES.

Diese Vortragsreihe ist Teil der umfassenden Solidaritätsaktion des Historischen Seminars der Fakultät für Geschichts- und Kunstwissenschaften zugunsten von Wissenschaftler:innen, die vom Krieg betroffen sind. Mit der Vortragsreihe werden besonders Wissenschaftler:innen unterstützt, die die Ukraine aus verschiedensten Gründen nicht verlassen können oder wollen.

Bitte unterstützen Sie unsere Solidaritätsaktion für Wissenschaftler:innen aus der Ukraine. Ihr Beitrag hilft - wir freuen uns über jeden Euro und können versichern, dass Ihre Spende verantwortungsvoll, zielgenau und auch zeitnah eingesetzt wird. Vielen Dank!

Termine:

08.04.2022 Yiddish Sources and Resources

Yiddish Sources and Resources: My Personal Path to Jewish and Yiddish Studies

In this talk, Tetyana Batanova gives an overview of unique documentary and literary Yiddish sources written or published in Ukraine or about Ukraine in the 20th century with special focus on Yiddish sources of 1917–1919. She also shares how Yiddish studies and Yiddish literature have served her as an emotional resource to draw from during this current war.

Tetyana Batanova is a research fellow and acting head of the Judaica Department of Institute of Manuscript of V. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine; and a member and secretary of the Ukrainian Association for Jewish Studies. She taught Yiddish at the Master Program in Jewish Studies and the Interdisciplinary Certificate Program in Jewish Studies at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, and was a guest lecturer at the WJC International Yiddish Center Vilnius. She has translated into Ukrainian several works of Yiddish literature. Tetyana Batanova’s research interests include archival and library Jewish heritage; Yiddish language, literature and culture; Ukrainian-Jewish relations; and the history of Jewish political parties in 1917–1918.

The webinar was moderated by Iryna Klymenko (LMU), and Magda Teter, the Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies.

Freitag, 08.04.2022, 15 Uhr [10AM (US Eastern Time)/3PM (Germany)/4PM (Ukraine)]

zur Aufzeichnung (You Tube)

01.04.2022 Looking for New Frameworks

Looking for New Frameworks: On the (In)visibility of Ukraine in Culture and Academia

This panel features Sofia Dyak, historian, Director of the Lviv Center for Urban History in Lviv, Daria Badior, culture editor, critic, and journalist, and Iryna Klymenko, a historian at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. They discuss questions of the existing structures of power and hierarchies in culture, knowledge production, and research, and the place of Ukraine in this global framework. They urge us to rethink and change lasting inequalities in culture and academia in relation to Ukraine.

Daria Badior is a culture editor, critic, and journalist. Curator at Kyiv Critics’ Week film festival and co-founder of the Ukrainian Film Critics’ Union. From 2016 to 2018 she was a member of the Ukrainian Oscars Committee.

Dr. Sofia Dyak holds degrees both in history and sociology. Since 2010, she has served as the Director of the Lviv Center for Urban History. Dr. Dyak’s research interests include post-war urban recovery and transformation in Eastern Europe, heritage infrastructures and practices in socialist cities, and their legacies. Another area of her interest is public history. Dr. Dyak has curated exhibitions and educational projects related to rethinking the past, especially in urban public spaces.

Dr. Iryna Klymenko is a scholar of early modern European history with a particular interest in European entangled history of 'East' and 'West' as well as in historical theory and interdisciplinary methods of historical research. She has been instrumental in creating this series.

Moderated by Magda Teter, the Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies at Fordham University.

Freitag, 01.04.2022, 15 Uhr [10AM (US Eastern Time)/3PM (Germany)/4PM (Ukraine)]

zur Aufzeichnung (You Tube)

24.03.2022 Preserving Historical and Cultural Heritage at the Time of War: The Case of Kharkiv

Preserving Historical and Cultural Heritage at the Time of War: The Case of Kharkiv

The Russian attack on Ukraine has disrupted lives and displaced millions of people. Fordham’s Center for Jewish Studies is partnering with the American Academy for Jewish Research, which had done work rescuing Jewish scholars in Nazi Germany and postwar Europe, and The Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich and its History Department, which has been actively providing aid for displaced scholars in Germany, as well as the Lviv Center for Urban History, which is actively aiding scholars displaced from different regions in Ukraine. This lecture series is a part of a broader effort on behalf of scholars affected by the war, including a joint AAJR-Fordham Fellowship for Ukrainian Scholars.

Panelists in this webinar discussed questions of preserving heritage of destroyed cities while rebuilding in a new way after the war ends. They considered the impact of war on the transformation of cities as living spaced, as places of commemoration, and as population centers, whose demographic make up will be impacted by the war.

Artem Kharchenko is a historian and project coordinator at the Kharkiv’s Center for Interethnic Relations Research in Eastern Europe. Dr. Kharchenko’s work focuses on Kharkiv and its history. He has studied “Jewish community in the space of Russian Imperial city: Kharkiv, 1859-1914) and “Forcible Transfers of Children in USSR (Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic): 1928-1935.” He has been involved in numerous international projects devoted to Jewish history and heritage, including “Jewish heritage in Belarus and Ukraine: presentation, education, popularization.” He has received numerous fellowships, including from the Rothschild Foundation.

Iryna Matsevko is a historian and Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the Kharkiv School of Architecture. Between 2013-2019 she was the deputy director of the Center for Urban History in Lviv. Dr. Matsevko’s research interests lie in urban history and heritage with focus on inclusive approaches in studying and presenting cultural heritage, heritage practices and sustainable cities and communities.

Yuri Radchenko is also a historian. He is the co-founder and the Director of the Center for Interethnic Relations Research in Eastern Europe in Kharkiv. His Ph.D. dissertation was on “Nazi Genocide of the Ukrainian Jews in the Military-Administered Area (1941-1943)“. He is also a Research Fellow Yahad In Unum, a French organization founded to locate the sites of mass graves of Jewish victims of the Nazi mobile killing units, especially the Einsatzgruppen, in Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania and Moldova.

The webinar was moderated by Iryna Klymenko (LMU), and Magda Teter, the Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies

Donnerstag, 24.03.2022, 15 Uhr (10AM (EDT)/3PM (Germany)/4PM (Ukraine)

Zur Aufzeichnung (You Tube)

18.03.2022 People, Science, Heritage

People, Science, Heritage

Dr. Vitaly Chernoivanenko is Senior Research Fellow at Judaica Department in the Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine and President of Ukrainian Association for Jewish Studies. He also serves as chief editor of Judaica Ukrainica. He is based in Kyiv. Dr. Chernoivanenko’s work lies predominantly in ancient Judaism, his dissertation was on the Dead Sea Scrolls and he has since published about various aspects of ancient Judaism, including on homoeroticism in Judaism.

Dr. Sofia Dyak is a holds degrees both in history and sociology. Since 2010, she has served as the Director of the Lviv Center for Urban History. Dr. Dyak’s research interests include post-war urban recovery and transformation in Eastern Europe, heritage infrastructures and practices in socialist cities, and their legacies. Another area of her interest is public history. Dr. Dyak has curated exhibitions and educational projects related to rethinking the past, especially in urban public spaces.

Freitag, 18.03.2022, 15 Uhr (10AM (EDT)/3PM (Germany)/4PM (Ukraine)

Moderation: Dr. Iryna Klymenko, LMU und Prof. Magda Teter, Fordham University

zur Aufzeichnung (You Tube)


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